Nipobithi

Nipobithi Bar Cum Resort

Plassey is a village on the east bank of Bhagirathi River

Palashi or Plassey is a village on the east bank of Bhagirathi River, located approximately 50 kilometres north of the city of Krishnanagar in Kaliganj CD Block

Nipobithi Bar Cum Resort

Plassey is a village on the east bank of Bhagirathi River

Palashi or Plassey is a village on the east bank of Bhagirathi River, located approximately 50 kilometres north of the city of Krishnanagar in Kaliganj CD Block

 

It is particularly well known due to the Battle of Plassey fought there in June 1757, between the private army of the British East India Company and the army of Siraj-ud-Daulah, the Nawab of Bengal.

The name Palashi is derived from the Bengali word for the red-flowered tree পলাশ (ISO: palāś, English: Butea, Latin: Butea frondosa or Butea monosperma). The Bengali word is ultimately derived from Sanskrit: पलाश, romanized: palāśa. The British East India Company referred to it as ‘Plassey’.Palashi achieved historical significance when, on 23 June 1757, the Battle of Plassey was fought between the forces of Siraj-ud-Daulah, the last reigning Nawab of Bengal

Nadia district is mostly alluvial plains lying to the east of Hooghly River, locally known as Bhagirathi. The alluvial plains are cut across by such distributaries as Jalangi, Churni and Ichhamati. With these rivers getting silted up, floods are a recurring feature. The Krishnanagar Sadar subdivision, presented in the map alongside, has the Bhagirathi on the west, with Purba Bardhaman district lying across the river. The long stretch along the Bhagirathi has many swamps. The area between the Bhagirathi and the Jalangi, which flows through the middle of the subdivision, is known as Kalantar, a low-lying tract of black clay soil. A big part of the subdivision forms the Krishnanagar-Santipur Plain, which occupies the central part of the district. The Jalangi, after flowing through the middle of the subdivision, turns right and joins the Bhagirathi. On the south-east, the Churni separates the Krishnanagar-Santipur Plain from the Ranaghat-Chakdaha Plain. The east forms the boundary with Bangladesh. The subdivision is moderately urbanized. 20.795% of the population lives in urban areas and 79.205% lives in rural areas.

A gold coloured statue of Siraj ud-Daulah lies next to the Palashi Monument, in a clearing amidst mango orchards and fields. The tombs of Siraj ud-Daulah, Mir Jafar, their wives and a number of generals in Siraj’s army lie close by around Murshidabad. Mausoleums built around the tombs of Siraj Ud-Daula, Azimunessa begum and other soldiers who fell in the war can be found close by at Khosh Bag and Jafarganj cemetery.

In County Clare, Ireland, an estate owned by Major-General Robert Clive, was renamed Plassey in order to commemorate the Battle of Plassey and his successful part in it. At the nearby University of Limerick, the original office of the president was named Plassey House in the late 18th century, also to commemorate a family connection to the battle, and the building still serves as an important administrative centre of the university.

There is a Monument, commonly known as Palashi Monument established in memoirs of the martyrs of the battle. The Monument is protected and supervised by the Archaeological Survey of India. The grounds where the historic Battle of Plassey was fought is today marked with shrines, obelisks and memorials to the fallen generals and soldiers of Siraj-ud-Daulah. A set of three obelisks marks homage to the spot where Bakshi Mir Madan (the chief of the Nawab’s artillery), Bahadur Ali Khan (Commander of Musketeers) and Nauwe Singh Hazari (the Captain of Artillery) were killed in the battle.

A plaque indicates that they fell here at 14:00 on 23 June 1757 and were leaders of Nawab Siraj ud-Daulah, at the head of the charge ordered by Mir Madan. Almost 5 km north from the Plassey battlefield, there is a Tomb of Farid Shah in Faridpur village, Dead body of Mir Madan was buried there.